Self-reporting DSM-5/ICD-11 clinically significant intimate partner violence and child abuse: Convergent and response process validity

Richard E. Heyman, Jeffery D. Snarr, Amy M. Smith Slep, Katherine J.W. Baucom, David J. Linkh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and International Classification of Diseases-11th Revision (ICD-11; proposed) now include criteria for clinically significant (a) intimate partner violence (IPV) and neglect and (b) child abuse and neglect. However, existing measures of IPV and child abuse do not allow for assessment of established criteria. The current study examines the convergent and response process validity of the Family Maltreatment (FM) measure of clinically significant physical and psychological IPV and child abuse. Participants (N = 126) completed the FM via computer and measures of IPV (Revised Conflict Tactics Scale; Straus, Hamby, Boney-McCoy, & Sugarman, 1996) and child abuse (Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale; Straus, Hamby, Finkelhor, Moore, & Runyan, 1998) via paper-and-pencil. Participants who endorsed acts of aggression on the FM completed an audio-recorded computerized interview recounting the 2 most severe incidents. Verbalized incidents (n = 138) were coded for clinically significant family maltreatment. Results largely supported the convergent validity of the FM. Agreement of acts endorsed on the FM with those endorsed on convergent measures was excellent for IPV and physical child abuse, yet poor for psychological child abuse. Further, in support of the response process validity of the FM, comparison with observer ratings of interviews indicated few "false positives" and no "false negatives" on the FM across the examined types of clinically significant IPV and child abuse. In summary, the FM is a promising measure for the assessment of clinically significant physical and psychological abuse as defined in the DSM-5 and ICD-11 (proposed).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-111
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Child maltreatment
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Physical abuse
  • Psychological abuse
  • Reliable criteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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