Semantics, Surplus Meaning, and the Science of Fear

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

When subjective state words are used to describe behaviors, or brain circuits that control them nonconsciously, the behaviors and circuits take on properties of the subjective state. Research on fear illustrates the problems that can result. Subjective state words should be limited to the description of inner experiences, and avoided when referring to circuits underlying nonsubjectively controlled behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-306
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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