Sex-role typing as related to acceptance of self, acceptance of others, and discriminatory attitudes toward women

Susan M. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines four hypotheses relating sex-role typing to self-acceptance, acceptance of others, and sexist attitudes toward women. University students completed the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, the Berger Self-Acceptance Scale, and the Macho Scale. Findings showed more self-acceptance than acceptance of others among masculine-typed subjects and more acceptance of others than self-acceptance among feminine-typed subjects. Feminine-typed males and masculine-type females showed least self-acceptance among the six groups, while androgynous subjects showed highest self-acceptance. Masculine-typed males were least accepting of others and scored highest in discriminatory attitudes toward women. Male subjects showed greater variability than did female subjects on all scales, and Bem's measure of sex-role typing proved a more efficient moderator of scores of males than of those of females. Additional personality and behavioral research with sex-role typing variables is proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-415
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1978

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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