Sexual identity and HIV status influence the relationship between internalized stigma and psychological distress in black gay and bisexual men

Melissa R. Boone, Stephanie H. Cook, Patrick A. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Experiences of internalized homophobia and HIV stigma in young Black gay and bisexual men (GBM) may lead to psychological distress, but levels of distress may be dependent upon their sexual identity or HIV status. In this study, we set out to explore the associations between psychological distress, sexual identity, and HIV status in young Black GBM. Participants were 228 young Black GBM who reported on their psychological distress, their HIV status, and their sexual identity. Results indicated that internalized homophobia was significantly related to psychological distress for gay men, but not for bisexual men. HIV stigma was related to psychological stress for HIV-positive men, but not for HIV-negative men. Results indicate a need for more nuanced examinations of the role of identity in the health and well-being of men who have sex with men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)764-770
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2016

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • mental health
  • sexual behavior
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sexual identity and HIV status influence the relationship between internalized stigma and psychological distress in black gay and bisexual men'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this