Short-term implicit voice-learning leads to a Familiar Talker Advantage: The role of encoding specificity

Julie Case, Scott Seyfarth, Susannah V. Levi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Whereas previous research has found that a Familiar Talker Advantage - better spoken language perception for familiar voices - occurs following explicit voice-learning, Case, Seyfarth, and Levi [(2018). J. Speech, Lang., Hear. Res. 61(5), 1251-1260] failed to find this effect after implicit voice-learning. To test whether the advantage is limited to explicit voice-learning, a follow-up experiment evaluated implicit voice-learning under more similar encoding (training) and retrieval (test) conditions. Sentence recognition in noise improved significantly more for familiar than unfamiliar talkers, suggesting that short-term implicit voice-learning can lead to a Familiar Talker Advantage. This paper explores how similarity in encoding and retrieval conditions might affect the acquired processing advantage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)EL497-EL502
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume144
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Short-term implicit voice-learning leads to a Familiar Talker Advantage: The role of encoding specificity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this