Site specific knowledge for improving frequency allocations in wireless LAN and cellular networks

Jeremy K. Chen, Theodore S. Rappaport, Gustavo De Veciana

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper is the first analytical work to exhibit the substantial gains resulting from applying site specific knowledge to frequency allocation in wireless networks. Two new site-specific knowledge-based frequency allocation algorithms are shown to outperform all other published work. Site specific knowledge refers to knowledge of building layouts, the locations and electrical properties of APs, users, and physical objects. We assume that a central network controller communicates with all APs, and has site specific knowledge which enables the controller to predict, a priori, the received power from any transmitter to any receiver. Optimal frequency assignments are based on predicted powers to minimize interference and maximize throughput. Our algorithms consistently yield high throughput gains irrespective of network topology, AP activity level, and the number of APs, rogue interferers, and available channels. Our algorithms outperform the best published algorithm by up to 3.68%, 8.95%, 13.6%, 15.1%, 25.8%, and 84.9% for 50, 25, 20, 15, 10, and 5 percentiles of user throughputs, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 IEEE 66th Vehicular Technology Conference, VTC 2007-Fall
Pages1431-1435
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event2007 IEEE 66th Vehicular Technology Conference, VTC 2007-Fall - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2007Oct 3 2007

Publication series

NameIEEE Vehicular Technology Conference
ISSN (Print)1550-2252

Other

Other2007 IEEE 66th Vehicular Technology Conference, VTC 2007-Fall
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period9/30/0710/3/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Applied Mathematics

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