Smokers' interest in quitting and services received: Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation

Scott E. Sherman, Elizabeth M. Yano, Andy B. Lanto, Barbara F. Simon, Lisa V. Rubenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Given the prevalence of smoking, its impact, and the benefits of cessation, helping smokers quit should be a top priority for health care organizations. To restructure health care delivery and guide future policy, the authors used baseline survey data from an 18-site Veterans Health Administration group randomized trial to assess the level of interest in quitting smoking for a practice population and determine what smoking cessation services they reported receiving. Among 1941 current smokers, 55% did not intend to quit in the next 6 months, and the remainder intended to quit in the next month (13%) to 6 months (32%). Forty-five percent reported a quit attempt in the prior year. While nearly two thirds of smokers reported being counseled about cessation within the past year, only 29% were referred to a cessation program, and 25% received a prescription for nicotine patches. Tobacco control efforts within this population should focus on increasing the rate of assisting patients with quitting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Keywords

  • Counseling
  • Cross-sectional analysis
  • Primary care
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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