Smoking cues decrease prepulse inhibition of the startle response and increase subjective craving in humans

Kent E. Hutchison, Raymond Niaura, Robert Swift

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study investigated whether exposure to smoking cues would attenuate prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex and increase craving among smokers across 2 experimental sessions. It was hypothesized that exposure to smoking cues would result in a decrease in PPI. Twenty-six smokers were exposed to smoking cues and control cues in 2 experimental sessions 1 week apart. Results indicate that smoking cues reliably attenuated PPI in both the 1st and 2nd sessions as compared with control cues. Findings also suggest that smoking cues reliably increased craving, increased negative affect, and reduced positive affect relative to baseline measures in both sessions. Results are consistent with the premise that exposure to smoking cues precipitates increases in dopamine activation or changes in information processing that cause a disruption of PPI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-256
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Smoking cues decrease prepulse inhibition of the startle response and increase subjective craving in humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this