Spatial and seasonal distribution of aerosol chemical components in New York City: (2) Road dust and other tracers of traffic-generated air pollution

Richard E. Peltier, Kevin R. Cromar, Yingjun Ma, Zhi Hua Fan, Morton Lippmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We describe spatial and temporal patterns of seven chemical elements commonly observed in fine particulate matter (PM) and thought to be linked to roadway emissions that were measured at residential locations in New York City (NYC). These elements, that is, Si, Al, Ti, Fe, Ba, Br, and black carbon (BC), were found to have significant spatial and temporal variability at our 10 residential PM 2.5 sampling locations. We also describe pilot study data of near-roadway samples of both PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5 chemical elements of roadway emissions. PM 2.5 element concentrations collected on the George Washington Bridge (GWB) connecting NYC and New Jersey were higher that similar elemental concentration measured at residential locations. Coarse-particle elements (within PM 10-2.5) on the GWB were 10-100 times higher in concentration than their PM 2.5 counterparts. Roadway elements were well correlated with one another in both the PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 fractions, suggesting common sources. The same elements in the PM 2.5 collected at residential locations were less correlated, suggesting either different sources or different processing mechanisms for each element. Despite the fact that these elements are only a fraction of total PM 2.5 or PM 10-2.5 mass, the results have important implications for near-roadway exposures where elements with known causal links to health effects are shown to be at elevated concentrations in both the PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 size ranges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-494
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Keywords

  • child exposure/health
  • criteria pollutants
  • environmental monitoring
  • epidemiology
  • inhalation exposure
  • metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Spatial and seasonal distribution of aerosol chemical components in New York City: (2) Road dust and other tracers of traffic-generated air pollution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this