Spinning their wheels: a reply to Jane Humphries and Benjamin Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Jane Humphries and Benjamin Schneider have assembled several large databases of spinners’ production and wages that they believe disprove my view that high wages led to mechanization in eighteenth-century England. This reply examines their data and shows that they have little value for understanding the incentives to mechanize. In addition, I present new evidence that substantiates my earlier estimates of productivity and earnings. The high wage hypothesis is unimpaired by the critique of Humphries and Schneider.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1128-1136
Number of pages9
JournalEconomic History Review
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Economics and Econometrics

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