Standardized cancer incidence disparities in Upper Manhattan New York City neighborhoods: The role of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and known risk factors

Dana Hashim, Zeinab Farhat, Sylvan Wallenstein, Marta Manczuk, Randall F. Holcombe, Lorna Thorpe, Maria J. Schymura, Roberto G. Lucchini, Paolo Boffetta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the effects of race/ethnicity and neighborhood, a proxy of socioeconomic status, on cancer incidence in New York City neighborhoods: East Harlem (EH), Central Harlem (CH), and Upper East Side (UES). In this ecological study, Community Health Survey data (2002-2006) and New York State Cancer Registry incidence data (2007-2011) were stratified by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood. Logistic regression models were fitted to each cancer incidence rate with race/ethnicity, neighborhood, and Community Health Survey-derived risk factors as predictor variables. Neighborhood was significantly associated with all cancers and 14 out of 25 major cancers. EH and CH residence conferred a higher risk of all cancers compared with UES (OR=1.34, 95% CI 1.07-1.68; and OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.12-1.72, respectively). The prevalence of diabetes and tobacco smoking were the largest contributors toward high cancer rates. Despite juxtaposition and similar proximity to medical centers, cancer incidence disparities persist among EH, CH, and UES neighborhoods. Targeted, neighborhoodspecific outreach may aid in reducing cancer incidence rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2016

Keywords

  • Healthcare disparities
  • Incidence
  • Neoplasms
  • New York City
  • Socioeconomic factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

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