Stereotyping and evaluation in implicit race bias: Evidence for independent constructs and unique effects on behavior

David M. Amodio, Patricia G. Devine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Implicit stereotyping and prejudice often appear as a single process in behavior, yet functional neuroanatomy suggests that they arise from fundamentally distinct substrates associated with semantic versus affective memory systems. On the basis of this research, the authors propose that implicit stereotyping reflects cognitive processes and should predict instrumental behaviors such as judgments and impression formation, whereas implicit evaluation reflects affective processes and should predict consummatory behaviors, such as interpersonal preferences and social distance. Study 1 showed the independence of participants' levels of implicit stereotyping and evaluation. Studies 2 and 3 showed the unique effects of implicit stereotyping and evaluation on self-reported and behavioral responses to African Americans using double-dissociation designs. Implications for construct validity, theory development, and research design are discussed. Copyright by the 2006 American Psychological Association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-661
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Keywords

  • Affect
  • African Americans
  • Cognition
  • Implicit evaluation
  • Prejudice
  • Race bias
  • Stereotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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