Stressful Events, Avoidance Coping, and Unprotected Anal Sex Among Gay and Bisexual Men

James I. Martin, Edward J. Alessi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined associations among stressful life events, avoidance coping, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) in a convenience sample of 297 men obtained through the Internet and who either reported having sex with men or self-identified as gay or bisexual. Participants completed an Internet-hosted self-administered questionnaire that included measures of victimization experiences and other stressful life events, and avoidance coping. More than half of the sample reported engaging in UAS during the previous 6 months. Victimization predicted UAS regardless of partner type; victimization, HIV-positive serostatus, and avoidance coping predicted UAS with nonprimary partners. The findings provide evidence that American gay and bisexual men may experience a variety of stressful life events, including a surprising amount of victimization, and that at least some episodes of UAS may be associated with attempts to cope with distress associated with such events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-301
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Keywords

  • Avoidance coping
  • Bisexual men
  • Gay men
  • HIV
  • Sexual behavior
  • Stress
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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