Students’ epistemological framing of roles in a collaborative game design project

Talia Hurwich, Camillia Matuk, Christopher M. Hovey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Collaborative design is a promising context for learning disciplinary and collaborative skills, but how students frame their roles impacts their participation, and is an important consideration in designing supports for interdependent, interdisciplinary collaborative activities. We examine grade 7 students’ approaches to designing board games for science learning in an out-of-school context. Here, team roles were divided by expertise in science, concept art and game design. Our qualitative analysis of student teams’ recorded discussions identified two contrasting cases of individuals’ expectations of their own and of others’ roles, and their differing collaborative outcomes. Findings illuminate how individual expectations can shape collaborators’ epistemological framings and participation, and have implications for supporting interdependent collaboration in other design-based activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsMelissa Gresalfi, Ilana Seidel Horn
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages725-728
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467262
StatePublished - 2020
Event14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Nashville, United States
Duration: Jun 19 2020Jun 23 2020

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020
CountryUnited States
CityNashville
Period6/19/206/23/20

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Epistemological frames
  • Game design
  • Middle school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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