The accidental feminist: On the pythagorean roots of John Selden’s Jani anglorum

Peter Goodrich

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Start with something incidental. A feminine moment. An instance of the speculum of another knowledge. Call it what you will. Among the declamatory exercises used for training lawyers at the time that John Selden was studying law at the Inns of Court is the paradox or contrary proposition that ‘women exceed men in excellence’. The topos comes from a Milanese orator, Ortensio Lando, but was translated from the French of Charles Estienne by the scholar, poet and playwright Anthony Munday with a speci? c view to use at the Bar:. .. for him that would be a lawyer. .. he must adventure to defend such a cause, as they that are most employed, refuse to maintain: thereby to make himself more apt and ready, against common pleaders in ordinary causes of process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFeminist Encounters with Legal Philosophy
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages39-49
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781135144791
ISBN (Print)9780415497602
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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  • Cite this

    Goodrich, P. (2013). The accidental feminist: On the pythagorean roots of John Selden’s Jani anglorum. In Feminist Encounters with Legal Philosophy (pp. 39-49). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203797112-9