The behavioural preview effect with faces is susceptible to statistical regularities: Evidence for predictive processing across the saccade

Christoph Huber-Huber, David Melcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The world around us appears stable and continuous despite saccadic eye movements. This apparent visual stability is achieved by trans-saccadic perception leading at the behavioural level to preview effects: performance in processing a foveal stimulus is better if the stimulus remained unchanged (valid) compared to when it changed (invalid) during the saccade that brought it into focus. Trans-saccadic perception is known to predictively adapt to the statistics of the environment. Here, we asked whether the behavioural preview effect shows the same characteristics, employing a between-participants training design. Participants made saccades to faces which could change their orientation (upright/inverted) during the saccade. In addition, the post-saccadic face was slightly tilted and participants reported this tilt upon fixation. In a training phase, one group of participants conducted only invalid trials whereas another group conducted only valid trials. In a subsequent test phase with 50% valid and 50% invalid trials, we measured the preview effect. Invalid training reduced the preview effect. With a mixed-model analysis, we could show how this training effect gradually declines in the course of the test phase. These results show that the behavioural preview effect adapts to the statistics of the environment suggesting that it results from predictive processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number942
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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