The developmental relationship between infants' exploration and action on slanted surfaces

Marion A. Eppler, Karen E. Adolph, Tamra Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research provides converging evidence that infants use exploratory activity to differentiate slant around a horizontal axis before they relate information about slant to consequences for locomotion. In Experiment 1, 14-month-old toddlers walked down safe, shallow 10° hills and slid down or avoided risky, steep 36° hills when height of the hills was held constant. Results indicate that judgements were based on slant. In Experiment 2, 9-month-old crawling infants explored shallow 10° and steep 30° slopes differentially in a nonlocomotor task. Exploration was similar to previous locomotor research with full-size hills, even though crawlers plunged head-long over both shallow and steep hills in the earlier study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Crawling infants
  • Exploration exploratory behavior
  • Locomotion
  • Slant perception
  • Slanted surfaces
  • Slopes
  • Walking infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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