The discrete fourier transform

Ivan W. Selesnick, Gerald Schuller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The importance of Fourier analysis in general is put forth very well by Leon Cohen [12]: … Bunsen and Kirchhoff, observed (around 1865) that light spectra can be used for recognition, detection, and classification of substances because they are unique to each substance. This idea, along with its extension to other waveforms and the invention of the tools needed to carry out spectral decomposition, certainly ranks as one of the most important discoveries in the history of mankind.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Transform and Data Compression Handbook
PublisherCRC Press
Pages37-79
Number of pages43
ISBN (Electronic)9781420037388
ISBN (Print)9780849336928
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Selesnick, I. W., & Schuller, G. (2000). The discrete fourier transform. In The Transform and Data Compression Handbook (pp. 37-79). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420037388