The effect of absenteeism and clinic protocol on health outcomes: The case of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kenya

Markus Goldstein, Joshua Graff Zivin, James Habyarimana, Cristian Pop-Eleches, Harsha Thirumurthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We show that pregnant women whose first clinic visit coincides with the nurse's attendance are 58 percentage points more likely to test for HIV and 46 percent more likely to deliver in a hospital. Furthermore, women with high pretest expectations of being HIV positive, whose visit coincides with nurse attendance, are 25 and 7.4 percentage points more likely to deliver in a hospital and receive PMTCT medication, and 9 percentage points less likely to breast-feed than women whose visit coincides with nurse absence. The shortcomings that prevent pregnant women from testing on a subsequent visit are common in sub-Saharan Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-85
Number of pages28
JournalAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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