The effect of bioceramic surface modifications on different endosseous implant and surgical design. A series of in vivo studies in dogs

Paulo G. Coelho, Marcelo Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this series of experiments was to evaluate the effect of bioceramic coatings/ incorporations on implant surfaces as a function of implant and surgical drilling design. Methods: A series of four in vivo studies were conducted utilizing the dog proximal tibia model. The models provided implants that remained from 2 to 5 weeks implantation time. The different studies comprised the placement of implants with intimate contact with bone following placement and implant designs that resulted in healing chambers. The various implant types presented surfaces with and without Ca- and P-based bioceramic incorporations. Biomechanical and histomorphometric measurements along with qualitative bone-implant interface morphology evaluation were performed. For all studies, one-way ANOVA at 95% level of significance was employed along with Tukey's post-hoc multiple comparisons. Results: Close contact between cortical and trabecular bone and all the different implant surfaces irrespective of implant fit (with and without healing chambers) showed that all surfaces were biocompatible and osteoconductive. In general, appositional bone healing was observed at all implant regions that were in intimate contact with bone immediately after placement, and an intramembranous-like healing occurred throughout the whole volume of the healing chambers. Irrespective of implant + surgical drilling design, the presence of Ca and P resulted in a bone morphology that showed primary osteonic structures at earlier times than uncoated surfaces. Conclusion: Irrespective of implant design and surgical drilling combination, the presence of Ca and P on the implant surface positively modulated early healing around endosseous implants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-388
Number of pages4
JournalKey Engineering Materials
Volume396-398
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Bioceramic
  • Dog
  • Implant
  • In-vivo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of bioceramic surface modifications on different endosseous implant and surgical design. A series of in vivo studies in dogs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this