The effect of peer-driven intervention on rates of screening for AIDS clinical trials among African Americans and Hispanics

Marya Viorst Gwadz, Noelle R. Leonard, Charles M. Cleland, Marion Riedel, Angela Banfield, Donna Mildvan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: We examined the efficacy of a peer-driven intervention to increase rates of screening for AIDS clinical trials among African Americans and Hispanics living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: We used a randomized controlled trial design to examine the efficacy of peer-driven intervention (6 hours of structured sessions and the opportunity to educate 3 peers) compared with a time-matched control intervention. Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (n=342; 43.9% female; 64.9% African American, 26.6% Hispanic). Most participants (93.3%) completed intervention sessions and 64.9% recruited or educated peers. Baseline and post-baseline interviews (94.4% completed) were computer-assisted. A mixed model was used to examine intervention effects on screening. Results: Screening was much more likely in the peer-driven intervention than in the control arm (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=55.0; z=5.49, P<.001); about half of the participants in the intervention arm (46.0%) were screened compared with 1.6% of controls. The experience of recruiting and educating each peer also increased screening odds among those who were themselves recruited and educated by peers (AOR=1.4; z=2.06, P<.05). Conclusions: Peer-driven intervention was highly efficacious in increasing AIDS clinical trial screening rates among African Americans and Hispanics living with HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1096-1102
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume101
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of peer-driven intervention on rates of screening for AIDS clinical trials among African Americans and Hispanics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this