The effects of antipoverty programs on children's cumulative level of poverty-related risk

Anna Gassman-Pines, Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors examined the effects of antipoverty programs on children's cumulative poverty-related risk and the relationship between cumulative poverty-related risk and child outcomes among low-income families. Samples included 419 children ages 3-10 years in the New Hope program and 759 children ages 2-9 years in the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), which tested 2 program approaches. Nine poverty-related risks made up the measure of cumulative risk. Both MFIP program approaches reduced cumulative poverty-related risk. New Hope reduced cumulative poverty-related risk among long-term welfare recipients. In both New Hope and MFIP, significant linear relationships between cumulative poverty-related risk and parent-reported behavior problems and school achievement were found. Cumulative poverty-related risk partially mediated the impacts of the MFIP programs on children's behavior problems. Among long-term welfare recipients, cumulative poverty-related risk partially mediated New Hope's impact on parent-reported school achievement. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-999
Number of pages19
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

Keywords

  • Antipoverty programs
  • Behavior problems
  • Child behavior
  • Cumulative risk
  • Policy
  • Poverty
  • Program evaluation
  • School achievement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of antipoverty programs on children's cumulative level of poverty-related risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this