The impact of indirect questioning: asking about you versus your friends

Daphna Harel, Dorothy Seaman, Jennifer Hill, Elisabeth King, Dana Burde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Indirect questioning attempts to overcome social desirability bias in survey research. However, to properly analyze the resulting data, it is crucial to understand how it impacts responses. This study analyzes results from a randomized experiment that tests whether direct versus indirect questioning methods lead to different results in a sample of 8,426 youths in Kenya and Pakistan. Through an examination of differential item functioning and regression analyses, we find that question wording leads to differences in how scales should be scored. We conclude that the use of indirect questioning should be undertaken with caution as a method to replace direct questioning.

Keywords

  • differential item functioning
  • indirect questioning
  • Item response theory
  • survey research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of indirect questioning: asking about you versus your friends'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this