The impact of patient education about the effect of zidovudine on HIV perinatal transmission: Knowledge gain, attitudes, and behavioral intent among women with and at risk of HIV

C. Healton, A. Dumois, S. Taylor, N. Loewenstein, C. Burr, J. Kaye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The termination of the perinatal HIV transmission trial, ACTG 076, by the Data Safety and Monitoring Board in February 1994 because of the efficacy of zidovudine (ZDV) in substantially reducing maternal-infant HIV transmission has created a considerable need for efficacious patient education approaches and materials for women with and at risk of HIV infection. Complexities surrounding patients' decisions to use ZDV in accordance with the treatment arm protocol of this study must be communicated to women, especially the consequences for both themselves and their potential children. In March 1994, a public-private partnership was formed to develop and test the impact of patient education information on 076 and to explore cultural differences in decision-making surrounding ZDV use during pregnancy. Objectives were (1) to develop an efficacious patient informational booklet on the results of ACTG 076 and (2) to determine the differential attitudes and behavioral intentions of women toward taking AZT during pregnancy. A multidisciplinary group of providers and researchers developed the patient education booklet and field-tested it in five New York City area sites. Subjects were a multiethnic group of women of childbearing age who were predominantly HIV-positive or at risk of HIV infection (n = 120). This 076 education resulted in a substantial increase in intention to use ZDV to reduce perinatal transmission despite full disclosure of the unknowns (P < .001). There were differences in knowledge acquired between racial/ethnic groups, which must be viewed cautiously since the study did not assess socioeconomic status adequately. Attitudes toward ZDV (P < .05), trust in health care providers (P < .03), and opinions on whether testing should be voluntary (P < .02) also varied by race/ethnicity. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): perinatal transmission, AIDS education, pregnancy, HIV, ACTG 076.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume12
Issue number4 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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