The Influence of Familial and Peer Social Support on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Black Girls in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

Camille R. Quinn, Donte T. Boyd, Bo Kyung Elizabeth Kim, Sujeeta E. Menon, Patricia Logan-Greene, Eseosa Asemota, Ralph Joseph Diclemente, Dexter Voisin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Black girls bear a higher burden of juvenile justice involvement in the United States, relative to other racial/ethnic female groups. Emerging evidence suggests that system involvement is related to trauma histories and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study investigated the associations between individual, family, and peer factors, and their relationship to PTSD among Black girls with juvenile justice involvement. Cross-sectional data were collected from 188 Black girls in detention. Measures assessed were history of abuse, negative peer norms, future orientation, caregiver support, self-esteem, age, and PTSD symptoms. Major regression findings indicated that higher rates of caregiver support, higher negative peer norms, lower self-esteem rates, and lower future orientation rates were correlated with greater PTSD symptoms. Treatment programs for this population warrant a multisystemic approach, which includes caregivers and peers, and bolstering important constructs such as self-esteem and hopefulness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • corrections
  • parenting
  • peer influence
  • sexual abuse
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Influence of Familial and Peer Social Support on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Black Girls in Juvenile Correctional Facilities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this