The influence of psychosocial factors, alcohol, drug use on African- American women's high-risk sexual behavior

Gina M. Wingood, Ralph J. DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The present study examines psychosocial and behavioral influences, particularly drug and alcohol use, as correlates of inconsistent condom use and having multiple sexual partners during the past month among African-American women. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted between May and June 1996, recruited a convenience sample of 180 African- American women in Birmingham, Alabama. Women completed a face-to-face interview that assessed alcohol and drug use, sexual behaviors, depression, condom use, and negotiation skills. Results: The majority of women, 51.6% (n = 93), had used either alcohol or drugs during the previous month. Many women, 31.1%, consumed alcohol, 18.3% used marijuana, and 8.3% had smoked crack within the past month. Nearly 42.7% of women used condoms inconsistently in the past month and 13.3% of women had multiple sexual partners within the past month. A logistic regression model predicting inconsistent condom use indicated that women were less likely to use condoms if they consumed alcohol between 20 and 30 days of the month (OR = 2.8, 90% CI = 1.3-5.9) and if they had not negotiated condom use (OR = 32.4, 90% CI = 7.9-131.6). The logistic regression model predicting multiple sexual partners indicated that women were more likely to have multiple sexual partners if they had smoked crack in the past month (OR = 5.3, 90% CI = 1.6-18.2). Conclusion: HIV sexual risk-reduction interventions for African-American women need to address the overlapping epidemics of drugs, alcohol, and STDs. Additionally, HIV sexual risk reduction efforts should be incorporated into existing drug and alcohol treatment programs and STD clinics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-59
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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