The lockean case for religious tolerance: The social contract and the irrationality of persecution

Ryan Pevnick

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    John Locke's non-religious arguments for tolerance are often seen as inadequate. He is criticized for: (1) failing to give reasons in support of a strict separation between the roles of church and state; and (2) wrongly insisting that the coercion of belief is irrational. I argue that once we understand Locke's arguments for tolerance within the context of his social contract framework, his non-sectarian arguments can circumvent such criticisms. Lockean arguments for tolerance are thus stronger than typically supposed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)846-865
    Number of pages20
    JournalPolitical Studies
    Volume57
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 2009

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

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