The relationship between neuropsychological measures and the timed instrumental activities of daily living task in multiple sclerosis

Yael Goverover, Helen M. Genova, Frank G. Hillary, John DeLuca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) can result in cognitive deficits and a loss of functional independence. To date, little research has linked the observed cognitive and behavioral deficits in MS, especially those in the processing speed domain, to performance on tasks of everyday functioning. The present study examined the relationship between neuropsychological test performance and performance on the Timed Instrumental Activities of Daily Living task (TIADL) in individuals with MS, and in healthy controls (HCs). The TIADL is a functional measure, which assesses both accuracy and speed in one's performance of everyday activities. The MS group performed significantly worse on the TIADL relative to the HC group. Additionally, TIADL scores of individuals with MS were significantly correlated with neuropsychological measures of processing speed. TIADL scores were not, however, correlated with neuropsychological measures of verbal episodic memory or working memory. These results indicate that the impairments in processing speed may contribute to impairments in activities of everyday living in persons with MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)636-644
Number of pages9
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Cognitive functions
  • Instrumental activities of daily living
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuropsychological measures
  • Processing speed
  • Rehabilitation
  • timed instrumental activities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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