The relationship between self-awareness of neurobehavioral symptoms, cognitive functioning, and emotional symptoms in multiple sclerosis

Yael Goverover, Nancy Chiaravalloti, John DeLuca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine self-awareness of neurobehavioral symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) across three domains of function (apathy, disinhibition, and executive control), and examine the relationship between self-awareness and cognitive functioning. Methods: Twenty-six individuals with MS completed neuropsychological testing, measures of emotional functioning, and self-ratings of neurobehavioral symptoms using the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe), a 46-item questionnaire with subscales assessing frequency of symptoms in executive dysfunction, disinhibition, and apathy. Informants' ratings of the FrSBe were also obtained. Decreasing differences between patient and informant reports on each subscale of the FrSBe (concordance) indicate higher levels of self-awareness. Results: Results showed significant positive correlations between cognitive abilities and self-awareness of executive dysfunction and disinhibition. In contrast, affect symptomatology (measures of anxiety and depression) were negatively correlated with self-awareness of executive dysfunction. Conclusions: Level of self-awareness of neurobehavioral symptoms in MS is related to level of cognitive impairment. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety reduced the accuracy of self-reporting. Thus, a clinician who relies on self-reports in creating an evaluation and treatment plan should consider the patient's cognitive and emotional states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-212
Number of pages10
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Keywords

  • Affect measures
  • Concordance
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neurobehavioral symptoms
  • Neuropsychological measures
  • Rehabilitation
  • Self-awareness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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