The role of collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms for Asian and Latino children of immigrants

Taveeshi Gupta, Lauren Rogers-Sirin, Sumie Okazaki, Patrice Ryce, Selcuk R. Sirin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We conducted a 3-wave, longitudinal study to examine the role of ethnic collective self-esteem and United States (U.S.) collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms over time among Asian and Latino immigrant-origin adolescents (n = 171). Growth curve analysis revealed that anxious-depressed symptoms first decreased between 10th and 11th grade and then increased over time for both groups. Additionally higher levels of ethnic collective self-esteem were associated with lower levels of anxious-depressed symptoms only for Asian adolescents. There was a differing pattern for U.S. collective self-esteem such that for Latino adolescents, higher U.S. collective self-esteem was associated with higher anxious-depressed symptoms, whereas for Asian adolescents there was an inverse relationship with anxious-depressed symptoms. The results expand the literature on ethnic and U.S. collective self-esteem and their link to mental health. Implications of the findings for research in general, and for counseling immigrant youth and families in particular, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-230
Number of pages11
JournalCultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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