"The struggle made me a nonracialist": Why there was so little terrorism in the antiapartheid struggle

Jeff Goodwin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Most theories of terrorism would lead one to have expected high levels of antiwhite terrorism in apartheid South Africa. Yet the African National Congress, the country's most important and influential antiapartheid political organization, never sanctioned terrorism against the dominant white minority. I argue that the ANC eschewed terrorism because of its commitment to "nonracial internationalism." From the ANC's perspective, to have carried out a campaign of indiscriminate or "categorical" terrorism against whites would have alienated actual and potential white allies both inside and outside the country. The ANC's ideological commitment to nonracialism had a specific social basis: It grew out of a long history of collaboration between the ANC and white leftists inside and outside the country, especially those in the South African Communist Party.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)193-203
    Number of pages11
    JournalMobilization
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    StatePublished - Jun 2007

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

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