The value in studying large faunal collections using traditional zooarchaeological methods: A case study from Anglo-Saxon England

Pam J. Crabtree

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    New methods for the study of stable isotopes and ancient DNA have revolutionized zooarchaeology in the twenty-first century. However, there are many questions about prehistoric and early historic hunting patterns and animal husbandry practices that can best be answered by studying large faunal assemblages using traditional zooarchaeological methods, including basic identifications and body-part distributions, age and sex profiles, and standard measurement data. These low-tech methods can inform us about the use of animals for secondary products and economic intensification, as well as long term changes in butchery practices, animal sizes, and hunting and husbandry practices. Zooarchaeological data from the Anglo-Saxon sites of Brandon and West Stow and the Late Roman site of Icklingham in eastern England will be used to illustrate the value of traditional methods for contemporary zooarchaeological research.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationZooarchaeology in Practice
    Subtitle of host publicationCase Studies in Methodology and Interpretation in Archaeofaunal Analysis
    PublisherSpringer International Publishing
    Pages173-188
    Number of pages16
    ISBN (Electronic)9783319647630
    ISBN (Print)9783319647616
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

    Keywords

    • Age profiles
    • Assemblage sizes
    • Butchery practices
    • Roman britain
    • Sample size

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)
    • Arts and Humanities(all)

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