Through the Lens of Movement-Evoked Pain: A Theoretical Framework of the “Pain-Movement Interface” to Guide Research and Clinical Care for Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions

Katie A. Butera, Ruth L. Chimenti, Ali M. Alsouhibani, Giovanni Berardi, Staja Q. Booker, Patrick J. Knox, Andrew A. Post, Ericka N. Merriwether, Abigail T. Wilson, Corey B. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Over 120 million Americans report experiencing pain in the past 3 months. Among these individuals, 50 million report chronic pain and 17 million report pain that limits daily life or work activities on most days (ie, high-impact chronic pain). Musculoskeletal pain conditions in particular are a major contributor to global disability, health care costs, and poor quality of life. Movement-evoked pain (MEP) is an important and distinct component of the musculoskeletal pain experience and represents an emerging area of study in pain and rehabilitation fields. This focus article proposes the “Pain-Movement Interface” as a theoretical framework of MEP that highlights the interface between MEP, pain interference, and activity engagement. The goal of the framework is to expand knowledge about MEP by guiding scientific inquiry into MEP-specific pathways to disability, high-risk clinical phenotypes, and underlying individual influences that may serve as treatment targets. This framework reinforces the dynamic nature of MEP within the context of activity engagement, participation in life and social roles, and the broader pain experience. Recommendations for MEP evaluation, encompassing the spectrum from high standardization to high patient specificity, and MEP-targeted treatments are provided. Overall, the proposed framework and recommendations reflect the current state of science in this emerging area of study and are intended to support future efforts to optimize musculoskeletal pain management and enhance patient outcomes. Perspective: Movement-evoked pain (MEP) is a distinct component of the musculoskeletal pain experience and emerging research area. This article introduces the “Pain-Movement Interface” as a theoretical framework of MEP, highlighting the interface between MEP, pain interference, and activity engagement. Evaluating and treating MEP could improve rehabilitation approaches and enhance patient outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Pain measurement
  • Participation
  • Physical performance
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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