Tobacco Product Use and Functionally Important Respiratory Symptoms Among US Adolescents/Young Adults

Susanne Tanski, Michael J. Halenar, Kathryn C. Edwards, Jennifer Emond, Steven Woloshin, Mary Brunette, Lisa Schwartz, Kristie A. Taylor, Maciej L. Goniewicz, Ray Niaura, Gabriella Anic, Yanling Chen, Priscilla Callahan-Lyon, Lisa D. Gardner, Theresa Thekkudan, Nicolette Borek, Heather L. Kimmel, K. Michael Cummings, Andrew Hyland, James Sargent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The relation between respiratory symptoms and the range of tobacco product use among US adolescents/young adults is not yet clear. This cross-sectional analysis examines tobacco product use and respiratory symptoms in a nationally representative sample of 21,057 adolescents/young adults aged 12–24 years from Wave 4 (2016–17) of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Methods: Presence of functionally important respiratory symptoms was defined by questions regarding wheezing and nighttime cough at a cutoff score associated with poorer functional health status. Past-30-day tobacco use was analyzed 2 ways: never-tobacco users (reference) versus combustible users, noncombustible-only users, and former users; or frequency of use of cigarettes and/or e-cigarettes. Weighted Poisson regression adjusted for past-30-day marijuana use, secondhand smoke exposure, and asthma. Results: Functionally important respiratory symptoms were present in 10.0% overall: 13.8% of combustible users, 9.0% of noncombustible users, 8.2% of noncurrent users and 9.7% of never users. Functionally important respiratory symptoms were associated with combustible tobacco use (relative risk [RR] = 1.52[95% CI 1.29, 1.80]), marijuana use (RR = 1.54[1.34, 1.77]) and secondhand smoke exposure (RR = 1.04[1.03, 1.05]). Higher cigarette smoking frequency was also associated with functionally important respiratory symptoms for frequency categories >14 days/month (eg, RR = 1.93[1.50, 2.49] for 15–29 days/month). Frequency of e-cigarette use was not associated with functionally important respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: During 2016–17, smoking cigarettes, marijuana use, and secondhand smoke exposure were cross-sectionally associated with functionally important respiratory symptoms in adolescents/young adults. Risk increased with increased frequency of cigarette use but not e-cigarette use. Given changes to contemporary e-cigarettes and use, findings may not generalize to newer products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • respiratory symptoms
  • tobacco use
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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