Toward a history of digital music: New technologies, business practices and intellectual property regimes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The chapter historicises the economics of music in the current age of technological automation - from the invention of intellectual property to the implementation of lock-down technologies at the turn of the twenty-first century. The first section sketches the basic characteristics of music’s technological, legal and political economies. By the late twentieth century, the precarious markets for music - enclosed within large-scale cycles of boom and bust in the nineteenth century - had morphed into a relatively stable set of intersecting industrial networks, including print, radio and phonograph. The second section sketches a transition period for the music industry in the context of distributed digital networks that emerged after the Cold War, producing a disjuncture between practice and policy. The third section traces the dialectics of intellectual property regimes pertaining to digital rights management, arguing that a covert allomorphism of the law effectively disabled both technical and legal functionalities pertaining to music.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Cambridge Companion to Music in Digital Culture
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages33-57
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9781316676639
ISBN (Print)9781107161788
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2019

Keywords

  • CSS
  • Digital music
  • Digital rights management
  • DMCA
  • Downloading
  • File sharing
  • MP3
  • Music industry
  • Political economy
  • SDMI
  • UGC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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