Towards an HIV Role Theory: Drug-related Peer Beliefs and Role Strain Indicators as Predictors of Injection Risk Behaviors among Puerto Rican Injection Drug Users in New York and Puerto Rico

Jonny F. Andia, Sherry Deren, Samuel R. Friedman, Charles Winick, Sungyeon Kang, Michael Palij, Rafaela R. Robles, Hector M. Colón, Denise Oliver-Velez, Ann Finlinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study assesses whether injection risk behaviors (e.g., syringe sharing and sharing injection paraphernalia) can be understood using a model that highlights drug related peer beliefs and role strain/deprivation. Data were collected on 561 Puerto Rican injection drug users in New York and 313 in Puerto Rico. A drug peer beliefs scale and three indicators of role strain were used with other control variables in a hierarchical multiple logistic regression model. Both aspects of the model were significant predictors of HIV risk behaviors in New York, but only role strain was a significant predictor for injection drug users (IDUs) in Puerto Rico. Individual-based paradigms should incorporate peer beliefs and role strain/deprivation in order to reduce HIV risk behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-982
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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