Towards Utopia: Designing tangibles for learning

Alissa N. Antle, Alyssa F. Wise, Kristine Nielsen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We describe a tangible user interface-based learning environment for children called Towards Utopia. The environment was designed to enable children, aged seven to ten, to actively construct knowledge around concepts related to land use planning and sustainable development in their community. We use Towards Utopia as a research prototype to investigate how and why tangible users interfaces can be designed to support, augment, or constrain learning opportunities. We follow a design-oriented research approach that includes a theoretically grounded analysis of design features of Towards Utopia to understand how and why design choices influence the kinds of learning opportunities created. We also describe the results of our empirical evaluation of learning outcomes in order to validate the effectiveness of our design. We conclude with general guidelines for the design of tangibles for learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of IDC 2011 - 10th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Pages11-20
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event10th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2011 - Ann Arbor, MI, United States
Duration: Jun 20 2011Jun 23 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of IDC 2011 - 10th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children

Other

Other10th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAnn Arbor, MI
Period6/20/116/23/11

Keywords

  • children
  • design
  • learning
  • sustainability
  • sustainability education
  • tangible computing
  • tangible user interfaces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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