Trends and sociodemographic disparities in sugary drink consumption among adults in New York City, 2009–2017

Nan Jiang, Stella S. Yi, Rienna Russo, Daniel D. Bu, Donglan Zhang, Bart Ferket, Fang Fang Zhang, José A. Pagán, Y. Claire Wang, Yan Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite efforts to decrease sugary drink consumption, sugary drinks remain the largest single source of added sugars in diets in the United States. This study aimed to examine trends in sugary drink consumption among adults in New York City (NYC) over the past decade by key sociodemographic factors. We used data from the 2009–2017 NYC Community Health Survey to examine trends in sugary drink consumption overall, and across different age, gender, and racial/ethnic subgroups. We conducted a test of trend to examine the significance of change in mean sugary drink consumption over time. We also conducted multiple zero-inflated negative binomial regression to identify the association between different sociodemographic and neighborhood factors and sugary drink consumption. Sugary drink consumption decreased from 2009 to 2014 from 0.97 to 0.69 servings per day (p < 0.001), but then plateaued from 2014 to 2017 (p = 0.01). Although decreases were observed across all age, gender and racial/ethnic subgroups, the largest decreases over this time period were observed among 18–24 year old (1.75 to 1.22 servings per day, p < 0.001); men (1.12 to 0.86 servings per day, p < 0.001); Blacks (1.45 to 1.14 servings per day, p < 0.001); and Hispanics (1.26 to 0.86 servings per day, p < 0.001). Despite these decreases, actual mean consumption remains highest in these same sociodemographic subgroups. Although overall sugary drink consumption has been declining, the decline has slowed in more recent years. Further, certain age, gender and racial/ethnic groups still consume disproportionately more sugary drinks than others. More research is needed to understand and address the root causes of disparities in sugary drink consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101162
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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