TRUST: Assessing the Efficacy of an Intervention to Increase HIV Self-Testing Among Young Black Men Who have Sex with Men (MSM) and Transwomen

for the TRUST Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

HIV testing among young Black MSM and transwomen (YBMSM/TW) is the gateway to biomedical HIV prevention or treatment. HIV self-testing (HST) is a method that may increase consistent HIV testing. TRUST, a brief, peer-based behavioral intervention, was designed to increase uptake of consistent (every three months) HST among YBMSM/TW in New York City. To test the efficacy of the intervention, we randomized 200 friend pairs into either the intervention condition (TRUST) or a time and attention control condition. A modified intent-to-treat analysis found that self-reported HST at 3-month follow-up was statistically significantly higher (uOR 2.29; 95% CI 1.15, 4.58) and at 6-month follow-up was marginally statistically significantly higher (uOR 1.94; 95% CI 1.00, 3.75) in the intervention arm as compared with the control arm. There were no statistically significant differences by arm at 9- or 12-month follow-up. TRUST, a culturally-congruent intervention to increase HST among YBMSM/TW, had short-term impact on past-three month HST. Clinical Trials Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT04210271.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1219-1235
Number of pages17
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Black men who have sex with men (MSM)
  • HIV self-testing
  • HIV testing
  • Peer intervention
  • Transwomen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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