Unauthorized Status and Youth Development in the United States: Consensus Statement of the Society for Research on Adolescence

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Carola Suárez-Orozco, Roberto G. Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the United States, 5.3 million children and adolescents are growing up either with unauthorized status or with at least one parent who has that status. Until recently, little in the way of research has informed federal, state, and local policy debates related to unauthorized status (e.g., border enforcement, deportation, and a pathway to citizenship) although these issues have important implications for youth development. This statement is a brief summary of the research evidence on multiple domains of development that may be affected by the child or parent's unauthorized status. We also describe the contextual and psychological mechanisms that may link this status to developmental outcomes. We summarize a range of policies and practices that could reduce the developmental harm to children, youth, and their families stemming from this status. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for policy, practice, and research that are based on the evidence reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-19
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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