Utilizing afterglow magnetization from cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to obtain simultaneous heteronuclear multidimensional spectra

James R. Banigan, Nathaniel J. Traaseth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The time required for data acquisition and subsequent spectral assignment are limiting factors for determining biomolecular structure and dynamics using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. While strong magnetic dipolar couplings give rise to relatively broad spectra lines, the couplings also mediate the coherent magnetization transfer via the Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (HH-CP) experiment. This mechanism is used in nearly all backbone assignment experiments for carrying out polarization transfer between 1H, 15N, and 13C. In this Article, we describe a general spectroscopic approach to use the residual or "afterglow" magnetization from the 15N to 13C selective HH-CP experiment to collect a second multidimensional heteronuclear data set. This approach allowed for the collection of two commonly used sequential assignment experiments (2D NCA and NCO or 3D NCACX and NCOCX) at the same time. Our "afterglow" technique was demonstrated with uniformly [13C,15N] and [1,3- 13C] glycerol-labeled ubiquitin using instrumentation available on all standard solid-state NMR spectrometers configured for magic-angle-spinning. This method is compatible with several other sensitivity enhancement experiments and can be used as an isotopic filtering tool to reduce the spectral complexity and decrease the time needed for assignment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7138-7144
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume116
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Materials Chemistry

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