Variations in Emotional, Sexual, and Physical Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Uganda: A Multilevel Analysis

Prince M. Amegbor, Laura Pascoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Evidence shows that a significant proportion of ever-partnered women suffer some form of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetuated by male partners. The prevalence of IPV in sub-Saharan African countries is considerably higher than global estimates. Although existing studies show the effect of women’s and intimate male partner’s characteristics on IPV, knowledge on how these factors increase or reduce women’s risk to specific types of IPV is limited. Using the 2016 Ugandan Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS), we examine regional variations in women’s and intimate male partner’s characteristics and their effect on emotional, sexual, and physical violence perpetuated by men and experienced by women in Uganda. The result shows that women’s educational status is a significant predictor of all forms of IPV, whereas other characteristics, such as employment and housing ownership, have differential effects on specific types of IPV. Less educated women were more likely to experience emotional, sexual, and physical violence. Alcohol abuse was a significant determinant of men perpetuating all types of IPV; other male characteristics had differential effects on specific types of IPV. Male partners who abuse alcohol “often” and “sometimes” were more likely to commit acts of emotional, sexual, and physical violence against their female intimate partners. The findings also show that ~5%, ~8%, and ~2% of the variance in emotional, sexual, and physical violence (respectively; in the final models) are attributable to regional differences. The findings suggest the need for interventions aimed at increasing women’s access to higher education, working with men and boys to reduce the occurrence of alcohol abuse and address harmful constructions of masculinity, and promoting gender equality among men as well as women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)NP7868-NP7898
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume36
Issue number15-16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • engaging men
  • gender equality
  • intimate partner violence
  • multilevel analysis
  • Uganda
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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