Visually guided navigation: Head-mounted eye-tracking of natural locomotion in children and adults

John M. Franchak, Karen E. Adolph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study showed that visual fixation of obstacles is not required for rapid and adaptive navigation of obstacles. Children and adults wore a wireless, head-mounted eye-tracker during a visual search task in a room cluttered with obstacles. They spontaneously walked, jumped, and ran through the room, stepping up, down, and over obstacles. Both children and adults navigated adaptively without fixating obstacles, however, adults fixated less often than children. We discuss several possibilities for why obstacle navigation may shift from foveal to peripheral control over development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2766-2774
Number of pages9
JournalVision research
Volume50
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Children
  • Eye-tracking
  • Locomotion
  • Obstacle navigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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