Wavelet transforms for the analysis of microarray experiments

T. A. Tokuyasu, D. Albertson, D. Pinkel, A. Jain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Array comparative genomic hybridization (cgh) is a microarray technology for measuring the relative copy number of thousands of genomic regions. Visual examination of cgh profiles shows that genomic changes occur on a variety of length scales. Such changes may be characteristic of phenotypic variables such as tumor type and gene mutational status. To aid in identifying such features and exploring their relationship with phenotypic outcomes, we are applying wavelet transforms to the analysis of such profiles. This allows us to decompose a cgh signal into components on different length scales, even when the genome is severely aberrated, providing a convenient basis for exploring their behavior. Wavelet transforms may also be useful in the realm of gene expression. The expression signal given by genes in clustered order can be wavelet transformed, which compresses the signal from many genes into a few components, possibly aiding in the development of new tumor classifiers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2003 IEEE Bioinformatics Conference, CSB 2003
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages429-430
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)0769520006, 9780769520001
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Event2nd International IEEE Computer Society Computational Systems Bioinformatics Conference, CSB 2003 - Stanford, United States
Duration: Aug 11 2003Aug 14 2003

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2003 IEEE Bioinformatics Conference, CSB 2003

Other

Other2nd International IEEE Computer Society Computational Systems Bioinformatics Conference, CSB 2003
CountryUnited States
CityStanford
Period8/11/038/14/03

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

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