We are “the Resistance”: Predictors and consequences of self-categorization into the emerging movement to oppose Trump

Samuel Hansen Freel, Rezarta Bilali, Erin Brooke Godfrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a three-wave longitudinal study conducted in the first 100 days of Trump’s presidency, this paper examines how people come to self-categorize into the emerging social movement “the Resistance,” and how self-categorization into this movement influences future participation in collective action and perceptions of the movement’s efficacy. Conventional collective action (e.g., protest, lobby legislators)—but not persuasive collective action (e.g., posting on social media)—and perceived identity consolidation efficacy of the movement at Wave 1 predicted a higher likelihood of self-categorization into the movement 1 month later (Wave 2) and 2 months later (Wave 3). Self-categorization into the Resistance predicted two types of higher subsequent movement efficacy perceptions, and helped sustain the effects of conventional collective action and movement efficacy beliefs at Wave 1 on efficacy beliefs at Wave 3. Implications for theory and future research on emerging social movements are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • collective action
  • collective efficacy
  • social movement identity
  • the Resistance
  • Trump

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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