“We're Supposed to Look Like Girls, But Act Like Boys”: Adolescent Girls’ Adherence to Masculinity Norms

Leoandra Onnie Rogers, Rui Yang, Niobe Way, Sharon L. Weinberg, Anna Bennet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the ecological systems perspective, gender ideologies are part of the macrosystem that shapes human development. A growing literature indicates that youth accommodate and resist such ideologies, with adherence to masculinity norms being linked with negative adjustment. Most masculinity research focuses on boys’ adherence to masculinity, but girls are also pressured to uphold masculinity norms. Using mixed modeling, we examined girls’ adherence to masculinity and psychological (self-esteem, depressive symptoms) and social (peer support and conflict) well-being in the United States (N = 407; Mage= 12.28) and China (N = 356; Mage= 12.41). In both countries, adherence to masculinity was negatively associated with psychosocial well-being. Chinese girls reported greater masculinity adherence, but associations with psychosocial well-being were not moderated by nationality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-285
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume30
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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