What Developmental Biology Can Tell Us about Innateness *

Gary F. Marcus

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines an apparent tension created by recent research on neurological development and genetics on the one hand and cognitive development on the other. It considers what it might mean for intrinsic signals to guide the initial establishment of functional architecture. It argues that an understanding of the mechanisms by which the body develops can inform our understanding of the mechanisms by which the brain develops. It cites the view of developmental neurobiologists Fukuchi-Shimogori and Grove, that the patterning of the part of the brain responsible for our higher functions is coordinated by the same basic mechanisms and signaling protein families used to generate patterning in other embryonic organs. Thus, what's good enough for the body, is good enough for the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Innate Mind
Subtitle of host publicationStructure and Contents
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199869794
ISBN (Print)9780195179675
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Brain development
  • Cognitive development
  • Genetics
  • Protein signaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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  • Cite this

    Marcus, G. F. (2007). What Developmental Biology Can Tell Us about Innateness *. In The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179675.003.0002