What do students learn about experimental research by designing interactive fiction games?

Anna Amato, Camillia Matuk, Dylan Schouten, Steven Sutherland, Gillian M. Smith, Casper Harteveld

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Research design is challenging to learn, and students have few hands-on experiences to practice it. We explore how StudyCrafter, a platform for creating and running research studies in the form of interactive fiction games, promotes students’ perceived and measured abilities in certain key research skills. Fourteen graduate students in a game design course used StudyCrafter during a 5-week-long unit on designing and conducting experimental research studies. Analyses of pre- and post-tests, and of students’ written post-unit reflections, showed that students’ confidence and abilities in designing research studies increased, but that their abilities to critique studies did not. This study contributes an understanding of the opportunities and challenges in using interactive fiction games to support students in developing their experimental research skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsMelissa Gresalfi, Ilana Seidel Horn
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages553-556
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467255
StatePublished - 2020
Event14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Nashville, United States
Duration: Jun 19 2020Jun 23 2020

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020
CountryUnited States
CityNashville
Period6/19/206/23/20

Keywords

  • Game design
  • Narrative
  • Research
  • University students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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