When values matter: Expressing values in behavioral intentions for the near vs. distant future

Tal Eyal, Michael D. Sagristano, Yaacov Trope, Nira Liberman, Shelly Chaiken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It was predicted that because of their abstract nature, values will have greater impact on how individuals plan their distant future than their near future. Experiments 1 and 2 found that values better predict behavioral intentions for distant future situations than near future situations. Experiment 3 found that whereas high-level values predict behavioral intentions for more distant future situations, low-level feasibility considerations predict behavioral intentions for more proximate situation. Finally, Experiment 4 found that the temporal changes in the relationship between values and behavioral intentions depended on how the behavior was construed. Higher correspondence is found when behaviors are construed on a higher level and when behavior is planned for the more distant future than when the same behavior is construed on a lower level or is planned for the more proximal future. The implications of these findings for self-consistency and value conflicts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Behavioral intentions
  • Construal
  • Construal level theory
  • Time perspective
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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