“Where You Lead, I Will Follow”: Partisan Cueing on High-Salience Issues in a Turbulent Multiparty System

Ted Brader, Lorenzo De Sio, Aldo Paparo, Joshua A. Tucker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The ability of parties to not only reflect, but actually shape, citizens' preferences on policy issues has been long debated, as it corresponds to a fundamental prediction of classic party identification theory. While most research draws on data from the United States or studies of low-salience issues, we exploit the unique opportunity presented by the 2013 Italian election, with the four major parties of a clear multiparty setting holding distinct positions on crucial issues of the campaign. Based on an experimental design, we test the impact of party cues on citizens' preferences on high-salience issues. The results are surprising: Despite a party system in flux (with relevant new parties) and a weakening of traditional party identities, we find large, significant partisan-cueing effects in all the three experimental issues, and for voters of all the major Italian parties—both old and new, governmental and opposition, ideologically clear or ambiguous.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)795-812
    Number of pages18
    JournalPolitical Psychology
    Volume41
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

    Keywords

    • Italy
    • experimental methods
    • experiments
    • partisanship
    • party identification
    • survey experiments

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Psychology
    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Clinical Psychology
    • Philosophy
    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Political Science and International Relations

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